JBoss

A fortnight ago Craig Muzilla and Paul Cormier announced the ambitious launching of xPaaS the Red Hat vision for the adoptance and standardisation of enterprise Cloud PaaS. By unifying a set of strategies and technologies proven in their own specific business areas, OpenShift and JBoss. Obviously with JBoss providing the underlying secured grunt under OpenShift it was only a matter of time before the realisation that there would be a defined offering made available for public consumption. xPaaS is very real and represents a subtle gamechanger that I'll provide further focus on in this article.

Leading from the front, Red Hat continue to shape and to prosper what Cloud is as a consumable catalogue service rich environment for enterprises to rack up to safely and with confidence. To outline a comprehensive, open and uniformed PaaS built of the constructs and technologies that are already used by so many customers you don't have to look too closely to realise that it also represents a clever move to circumvent the timeline of application migration to Cloud while lending credibility and an important tick box to the decision makers within enterprises who were otherwise looking to curtail ambition around Cloud deployment.

The JBoss teams in Red Hat have long since described JBoss technologies as cloud friendly, this just further provides continued emphasis that the engineering capabilities in Red Hat have moved one step further to extend beyond the datacenter and traditional enterprise network perimeter to Cloud.

Having read the reactions from the IT press and industry analysts now that the dust has settled a fortnight post announcement there are two major missing pieces of the jigsaw that they've missed entirely.

xPaaS - extending the catalogue to Service Providers

I have pointed out in talks I give at Cloud events and in my podcasts that one of the problems I've seen with Cloud providers globally was the rush to stand environments up to compete with Amazon or "to have something to offer". A lot of providers rushed to get Cloud 1.0 out the door and then had to bare the costs as those platforms then lost them a chunk of revenue whilst their traditional managed hosting businesses had to pay the bills. Sadly a lot of those platforms built around proprietary technologies mean that even now the costs of adoption have to be passed on to the customer, but also now mean that further re-architecture requirements to build a Cloud of "what people want" now mean a lot of that investment has to be made in Open technologies to remain relevant.

xPaaS for the first time means that those providers actually have a major reason to think about the writing off of those initial Cloud adoption costs to move to open hybrid cloud built of proven secure building blocks and to follow their more switched on counterparts and competitors using KVM as the hypervisor of choice. xPaaS hosted within a provider gives a Cloud provider partner something essential. Revenue stickiness. Customer onboarding and attraction is never easy in a crowded marketplace but now heres the gamechanger opportunity to be able to be a happy part of the foodchain rather than a bitter pill to swallow.

The second opportunity - the JBoss community win win

The JBoss eco-system is packed solid with the most amazing developers who both contribute to the upstream JBoss.org codebase but also who provide services and solutions built around JBoss. The emergence of xPaaS is a huge vote of confidence allowing them to be able to work with their enterprise customers to push solutions onto supported xPaaS either in public or private cloud, driving revenue opportunity and new partnership opportunities to these partners.

So in many ways the birth of xPaaS was always going to be significant, I hope by playing the angles we can demonstrate that it's more relevant than you thought possible as a vote of confidence in enterprise migration of applications to a secure business as usual platform as a service technology platform allowing you to do what you do best.

If you are planning on visiting VMWorld this week in San Francisco (see map here of locations across the show campus) please make sure to take time out to visit Booth 522 and meet my colleagues from Red Hat who are in attendance.

We will be talking Red Hat Open Hybrid Cloud, demonstrating CloudForms and the latest beta 2.1 which includes support for OpenStack, our OpenShift Enterprise platforms, Red Hat Enterprise Virtualisation and Red Hat Storage.

We love attending VMWorlds in the US and Europe and will also be attending the Barcelona show in the fall. It's always a busy booth packed with people wanting to know more about where we are at with Cloud.

More importantly this year for the first time we're demonstating CloudForms and it's ability to kick the ass of every other VMWare friendly virtualised environment across cloud types. It's a game changer that has analysts and the press alike talking about how Red Hat has enabled Cloud management to become a realistic technology adoption curve for enterprises. Taking the game to VMWare and Microsoft for the first time and it's not for nothing that customers are really excited and adopting fast.

Make time out to go visit Booth 522. Tell them I sent you.

Fresh out the blocks today we give you Red Hat's OpenShift Enterprise release 1.2, available now for consumption. Building on the success of the GA'd 1.0 release 1.2 gives even more versatility and power to handle the provisioning management and automation of the ultimate PaaS solution for public, private and Open Hybrid Cloud platforms supported and certified by us.

OpenShift Enterprise is a versatile platform for application development, operations, and IT architecture as it provides users with access to a cloud-based application platform built on a trusted stack of open source Red Hat technologies, including Red Hat Enterprise Linux, JBoss Enterprise Application Platform, and OpenShift Origin, the upstream code that powers both OpenShift Enterprise and OpenShift Online. OpenShift Enterprise automates much of the provisioning and systems management of the application platform stack in a way that enables the IT team to more easily meet growing business demands for new application services.

OpenShift Enterprise also provides an on-demand, elastic, scalable, and fully configured application development, testing and hosting environment for application developers so that they can focus on coding these new application services. With its unique Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) approach to handling secure multitenancy, OpenShift Enterprise also offers reliable security and multi-tenancy with the ability to subdivide the operating system instances for efficiency.

Find more infomation here !

summitcast

The last ten days have seen me camped out in Boston in the US at Red Hat Summit recording, mastering and publishing fourteen podcasts during Red Hat Summit. Usually I do one a week so to get fourteen recorded and out there on iTunes, Stitcher and a dedicated smartphone app for all platforms was tiring to say the least.

So for those of you wondering why there hadn't been a Cloud Evangelist podcast last week, go listen to the shows I made available to you on the Red Hat Official Podcast page from Summit by clicking here.

Podcasts on OpenShift, OpenStack, Gluster, RHEV, IBM PowerLinux, ARM and Hyperscale, identity management in the Cloud, SELinux (with Dan himself). We talk NetApp and oVirt with Jon Benedict once more and we have a lot of fun along the way.

Fourteen shows you can't miss out on with over 10,000 listeners to date - go listen.