PaaS

I was in Holland at the CloudStack Collaboration Conference and recorded a number of shows that have made it out via RSS but I haven't talked about here. So as it's the run up to Christmas today is a podcast bonanza with no less than four shows highlighted here for your aural delectation.

The first show I am bringing you here is with Tryggvi Lárusson of GreenQloud in Iceland. GreenQloud I wanted to talk to because they are 100% Green environmentally friendly. Using the thermal geological heat in the substrata of the Icelandic crust and hydroelectric power to power their datacentre. Big time Open Source user I wanted to hear from them about their startup and plans for growth.

  You can listen to this show directly by clicking this link

The second show is with a good new friend Arjan Eriks of Schuberg Philis in Holland who are a major cloud provider working with upstream verticals and customers in specific niche marketplaces (regulated and auditable cloud needs to meet Dutch and EU privacy specific workloads). A company who make revenue and who grow based entirely on their Cloud ambition. Great guy - commercial and balanced and able to paint a picture to the listener of what customers want and how to retain them.

The Red Hat Cloud Provider Programme is a great way of you being able to both stand up a business and also to attract, and to retain custom. Talk to me offline for more info.

  You can listen to this show directly by clicking this link

Remember you can listen via your chosen podcast client of choice by adding my RSS (http://cloudevangelist.libsyn.com/rss) or via iTunes, Podfeed, Stitcher or many of the syndicated sites that carry my content. In fact 90% of my readers now come from sites other than Cloudevangelist.org or redhat.com and that number is growing weekly. Just glad we put shows out that are easy to digest and to listen to. Remember, your feedback and your emails matter. If there is a show you like - tell folk, retweet it. This stuff is free and it's designed to help you.

One of the biggest tech cloud podcasts with over 130 episodes is Aaron Delp's Cloudcast show. It's one of my defacto shows to listen to with a different demographic and different style / length to the way that I work. Aaron is a perennial part of my listening habit so to sit down and do a podcast with him was a chance I would have grabbed at. So, the clash of the casts was born and today we recorded a session.

Sitting opposite us to give us a comprehensive OSS boost and to talk Cloud was Mark Hinkle of Citrix. Mark like all of us in the community eats, lives and breathes Open Source so this podcast always had potential.

Have a listen and see what you think.

 Download the podcast in MP3 format here - or alternatively browse the RSS.

I am recording this week in Amsterdam at the Cloudstack Collaboration Conference and you will see various shows appear throughout this week and next that I've recorded while on the ground here.

Todays show is with Antoine Coetsier from Exoscale in Switzerland, a country very close to my heart. Exoscale are a Cloudstack vendor/partner but also a Red Hat partner too who are actively working with large and medium sized organisations moving to Cloud.

I recorded this show yesterday afternoon and feel somewhat like a 1940s journalist trying to get copy back to my news desk having had what I can only describe as the slowest tethered internet connection I've had in 10+ years or more to upload this at 1.2k/sec. Painful. Would have been quicker to send it by carrier pigeon. Technology, it seems, in 3G carrier relationships is just poor across Europe.

Come back later for more shows from the conference.

 Download the podcast in MP3 format here - or alternatively browse the RSS.

A fortnight ago Craig Muzilla and Paul Cormier announced the ambitious launching of xPaaS the Red Hat vision for the adoptance and standardisation of enterprise Cloud PaaS. By unifying a set of strategies and technologies proven in their own specific business areas, OpenShift and JBoss. Obviously with JBoss providing the underlying secured grunt under OpenShift it was only a matter of time before the realisation that there would be a defined offering made available for public consumption. xPaaS is very real and represents a subtle gamechanger that I'll provide further focus on in this article.

Leading from the front, Red Hat continue to shape and to prosper what Cloud is as a consumable catalogue service rich environment for enterprises to rack up to safely and with confidence. To outline a comprehensive, open and uniformed PaaS built of the constructs and technologies that are already used by so many customers you don't have to look too closely to realise that it also represents a clever move to circumvent the timeline of application migration to Cloud while lending credibility and an important tick box to the decision makers within enterprises who were otherwise looking to curtail ambition around Cloud deployment.

The JBoss teams in Red Hat have long since described JBoss technologies as cloud friendly, this just further provides continued emphasis that the engineering capabilities in Red Hat have moved one step further to extend beyond the datacenter and traditional enterprise network perimeter to Cloud.

Having read the reactions from the IT press and industry analysts now that the dust has settled a fortnight post announcement there are two major missing pieces of the jigsaw that they've missed entirely.

xPaaS - extending the catalogue to Service Providers

I have pointed out in talks I give at Cloud events and in my podcasts that one of the problems I've seen with Cloud providers globally was the rush to stand environments up to compete with Amazon or "to have something to offer". A lot of providers rushed to get Cloud 1.0 out the door and then had to bare the costs as those platforms then lost them a chunk of revenue whilst their traditional managed hosting businesses had to pay the bills. Sadly a lot of those platforms built around proprietary technologies mean that even now the costs of adoption have to be passed on to the customer, but also now mean that further re-architecture requirements to build a Cloud of "what people want" now mean a lot of that investment has to be made in Open technologies to remain relevant.

xPaaS for the first time means that those providers actually have a major reason to think about the writing off of those initial Cloud adoption costs to move to open hybrid cloud built of proven secure building blocks and to follow their more switched on counterparts and competitors using KVM as the hypervisor of choice. xPaaS hosted within a provider gives a Cloud provider partner something essential. Revenue stickiness. Customer onboarding and attraction is never easy in a crowded marketplace but now heres the gamechanger opportunity to be able to be a happy part of the foodchain rather than a bitter pill to swallow.

The second opportunity - the JBoss community win win

The JBoss eco-system is packed solid with the most amazing developers who both contribute to the upstream JBoss.org codebase but also who provide services and solutions built around JBoss. The emergence of xPaaS is a huge vote of confidence allowing them to be able to work with their enterprise customers to push solutions onto supported xPaaS either in public or private cloud, driving revenue opportunity and new partnership opportunities to these partners.

So in many ways the birth of xPaaS was always going to be significant, I hope by playing the angles we can demonstrate that it's more relevant than you thought possible as a vote of confidence in enterprise migration of applications to a secure business as usual platform as a service technology platform allowing you to do what you do best.