Tag Archives: Open Hybrid Cloud

Alessandro Pirelli who heads up the Open Hybrid Cloud team here at Red Hat gave an impassioned presentation on his take on what the industry needs to understand to succeed and how Red Hat wants to help you get there.

If you have time make sure you sit through this video, it might be the smartest thing you do all week.

c1e1c27b-a864-475c-94fa-97c5a553ff2cThis weeks podcast is with Klaus Oxdal of Red Hat Nordics. Klaus is a good friend of mine who I've worked closely with for 3 1/2 years or so and he eats lives and breathes Red Hat. Much like my erstwhile American/Dutch TechGod colleague Eric Schabell he is one of the Red Hat EMEA cyclists spending a lot of time in Red Hat colours on the roads of Denmark.

Only this time he's going one better. Klaus is part of a team cycling from Denmark to Paris, France culminating in a sprint finish to the Eiffel Tower. It's all for a good event it's for a Children's Cancer Charity. It's a mammoth distance, it's a mammoth effort and I thought we'd tag onto the end of our conversation an invitation for people to find whatever they could afford to make a difference in treating childhood cancers. An amazing cause that deserves our support. I've stumped up cash as a parent of two children and I'd like to think we can help raise them some funds.

You can read more on their sponsorship page here, go visit it now !!

john_RMGluster.org Community Workshop and London Community Day 

In the podcast I also talk about Gluster.org the upstream of Red Hat Storage having a workshop at LinuxCon Europe (where I will be attending and doing the show podcast) and speaking with the likes of my shadow and compadre from Gluster.org / Red Hat John Mark Walker pictured with me above. The day is WELL WORTH ATTENDING if you're going to LinuxCon or even if you're not.

The workshop starts at a very reasonable 10 a.m. This full-day, free workshop includes talks on using Gluster with OpenStack, KVM/QEMU, and how to develop apps to integrate with GlusterFS. This is a chance for developers and admins to learn first-hand what GlusterFS and related open software-defined storage projects in the Gluster Community can accomplish in cloud and virtualized environments.

  • State of Gluster (John Mark Walker)
  • Gluster for SysAdmins, an In-depth Look (Dustin Black)
  • Gluster and OpenStack, a Case Study (Udo Seidel)
  • Gluster, QEMU and KVM (Vijay Bellur)
  • Developing Apps and Integrating with GlusterFS (Justin Clift)

Please join us on October 24th at the Sheraton next to the Edinburgh International Conference Centre. Registration for the Gluster Workshop is free, sign up today on the LinuxCon/CloudOpen sign-up page. Note: Choose the “Speaker” registration and use the code GLUSEU13 if you’re not registering / registered for the rest of the conference.

London Community Day - 29th October

In previous podcasts we've talked about the cancellation of the London Community Day, well it's all back on and taking place in London in Hoxton on 29th October. Again I am attending with podcast mic in hand !

There is a stellar cast of speakers and breakouts and you can register either by meetup.com or Eventbrite.

London Community Day Agenda

14:00 - 15:00 - The State of the Gluster Community - John Mark Walker, Red Hat
15:00 - 16:00 - GlusterFS for SysAdmins - Tom Llewelyn, Red Hat
16:00 - 16:15 - Break
16:15 - 17:00 - Cloud Storage with OpenStack and GlusterFS - Udo Seidel, Amadeus
17:00 - 18:00 - Gluster for Developers - Justin Clift, Red Hat
18:00 - 18:30 - Gluster Forge Demos
18:30 - 19:30 - Happy hour! Drinks and light snacks for everyone

I will be there and I look forward to seeing as many of you as possible. Now go download the podcast. Please. I'm asking nicely.

Download the podcast in MP3 format here - or alternatively browse the RSS

The consensus around the water fountain is in, the sensible folk are achieving and those that play catch up are spending way more corporate investment on keeping up with the achievers and go-getters in Cloud and virtualisation. That sums it up in a nutshell but to simply write an article with less than thirty eight words isn't going to suffice so let's explore where the Cloud market is making active differentiation in the evolving dynamic world of corporate and enterprise computing.

Blessed are the geeks for they will inherit the datacentre

There are very few differences in the manner that eighty percent of global enterprises tackle enterprise computing challenges. No matter whether exponents of purely "Cathedral" type platforms and toolsets or the "Bazaar" model of entrepreneurial achievement utilising open standards and challenging established paradigms of development and provisioning by reasoned utilisation and embracing of community ethics and freedoms. I hope I've got that right or my ex VA Linux colleague Eric Raymond is going to be less than happy. I use the word geek in the heading above with due reverence, without levity as a badge of achievement.

Whilst you could argue that venture capital and the influx of guidance in the form of management at many of the investment companies are the lifeblood of the evolution of new start companies developing and pushing technologies and products across Cloud. You could also observe that the vast majority of these organisations are building and ramping up harnessing and embracing open source libraries, binaries and technologies in order to get to revenue and to develop products that are relevant.

So what changed ?

The difference between now and the dot.com boom/bust era is that we grew up. Open source grew up too.

The difference is that in 1999/2000 a lot of the advisors who were often positioned or parachuted into new start companies using less "mature" developmental environments and an emerging internet were old school, 1980s/90s boardroom types, often expensive, entirely out of touch with working with dynamic energised folk who were capable at embracing tech but lacked maturity in corporate circles. Management came with money. I was there, I worked at Linuxcare from early days until I parachuted to safety to join the then ebullient VA Linux Systems. It was painful, it was replicated across hundreds of companies globally who all managed to burn huge amounts of funding rounds without generating products or significant revenue. A lot of the blame needs to be levied at the investors who handcuffed companies with legacy management who didn't understand the gulf between founder management and couldn't levy influence or control.

In the Cloud arena we have more startup companies producing better product with better guidance from more savvy investor folk, if any of you have ever bumped into the electrically charged spark that is Satish Dharmaraj for example, my former boss at Zimbra (now with a well known VC team) will understand the mental picture I paint entirely. Satish I pick out purely as an example, he isn't remotely alone in being a trail blazer, at Red Hat you can't throw a pebble without hitting a key manager or thought leader whose role it is to identify talent and opportunity and then nurture it. We even invest in technology regularly outside of Red Hat.

More importantly nowadays, most of these advisors attaching to first and second round funding have emerged from the Open Source community and are helping shape the direction that many Cloud startups are now able to follow. Thats a good thing. Lower burn rates, better code, better practices and revenue centric companies using Open Source as a base. For those basing companies on revenue (the small percentage) it's even more impressive.

However they ALL have one thing in common, they're all aiming to be relevant.

Make relevance your personal mantra for 2013, especially in Cloud

The number of times in recent months I've sat down with people in technology circles and talked open hybrid cloud, talked to them about how this gospel I preach weekly from my podcast pulpit of how at Red Hat we are working to demonstrate how we're innovating by providing key RELEVANT capabilities. If you're a listener to my podcast broadcasts I weekly try to provide you with balanced thought around cloud and virtualisation but with a passion that comes from a need to "do this right". To stay relevant with the needs of my listeners.

Arming, influencing, determining datacentre future behaviour and enterprise adoption of cloud across physical bare metal platforms, virtual, private cloud and public cloud with the Red Hat stack. Marshalling and creating the frameworks for growth that are significantly different from proprietary platforms such as VMWare and Microsoft and with more relevance (see it crops up again) to the problems that enterprise companies need to solve. Built openly, built with focus around application development and portability underwritten by the glue that is Red Hat's continued core open source belief as part of the fabric of cloud today. ISVs and startup companies who are aiming to be relevant and to drive product adoption and therefore revenue growth (either based on revenue or with the help of investors) are all looking to Cloud.

So next time you are stood, board marker in hand in front of your team drawing out your tiers of your architecture or brain blasting APIs and platform decisions with those in your circle who you rely on just consider. Is the technology and the platform and direction I am taking relevant ? Relevant now, relevant tomorrow, flexible and rugged enough to grow with your organisation, flexible enough to change securely, relevant enough to get you to the finish line, relevant enough to drive revenue and growth to match your ambition.

Unless you're doing this harnessing open technology, truly open source components and stacks you need to pay attention, you aren't going to be relevant, and neither is your Cloud.

If you want to know how this all glues together reach out to me and I'll point you at some folk who will change and empower your needs in Cloud. If you've been on Red Hat tour or been to Red Hat Summit (the next kicks off in Boston at The Hynes Convention Center in a few weeks time) then you'll be aware of the common sense relevance of what we mean by Open.

Red Hat - this is what we do, be open, be relevant and be part of the future of Cloud. Ignore me at your peril.

We released this video this week and I wanted to share it with you before Red Hat Summit in June, Paul Cormier, Jim Whitehurst and the exec team have worked hard with our Cloud BU marketing folk to get this put together.