Yesterday I was at London Ceph Days, an event co hosted by Red Hat and Dell talking the latest Ceph goodness. Great venue near Barbican, well attended but for those who couldn't make it or geographically seperated by distance I thought I'd take a mini studio of HD video cam, and some small studio lights and do a recording with Russ Turk VP of Community at Inktank, now a Red Hat company.

Always a pleasure to talk with Russ, we have a mutual employment history going back a long time and he's genuinely passionate about storage, cloud and the open source movement that we've spent so long working to prosper.

Here's the video. It will scale up to 720 and 1080p if you change your viewing options accordingly.

 

I have some more articles coming out on Opensource.com in the next few weeks centred on security in the wake of the Bash fallout from last week. I'm also going to be helping run our OpenShift workshops at Pycon in Dublin next week then flying to Dusseldorf for LinuxCon EU / CloudOpen and the oVirt workshops. I'm on the Open Source panel with old pals Jono Bacon and Leslie Hawthorn moderated by Guy Martin of Samsung who has of course appeared on my radio show in the past.

I'll be recording videocasts and some audio at both events whilst there. Keep a watch on my Twitter feed for forthcoming bits and pieces.

Coming later this week is a new radio show I am producing and co presenting. The show will be authored, presented and brought to life by a small group of the most technically gifted and capable folk that we have on the roll call here at Red Hat. John Mark Walker, Jon Benedict, Thomas Cameron, James Kirkland, Jon Masters, myself and a multitude of others will be talking about the latest and greatest stuff that we are working on, but also emerging tech.

The show will be broadcast on Apple iTunes, syndicated on Stitcher, Podfeed as well as on our RSS which I will publicise as soon as we go live.

Recorded entirely on Pulsecaster by Paul Frields of Red Hat's engineering team it's a major effort globally and represents a triumph of tech over adversity in so many ways !!

Check out the website at www.hombresinhats.com for information as it goes live and add the Twitter handle @hombresinhats to your bookmarks and feeds.

I was not present at VMWorld this week so I didn't get hands on opportunity to try and get to grips with a new technology quorum from Google, VMWare and Nvidia to bring datacentre based "thinclient on steroids" technology to the Chromebook enterprise user. You can read more information in this eWeek article from Jeffrey Burt.

I read it end to end and whilst anything that increases the adoption of Chromebooks (I now have four machines and am writing this article on one of them) in the enterprise thats great. However for Google I understand allowing fast seemless handling of enterprise apps on Nvidia CPU enabled machines with custom firmware and VMWare's Blast technology is one thing, on another hand personally its left me scratching my head.

Google have an absolute winner on its hands with the Chromebook. I ADORE MINE. My MacBook Pro's of which I have two or three now rarely ever get booted. I can now do everything I need for my Red Hat work on a Chromebook. Google Docs giving me enough power to draft documents, spreadsheets etc etc. Photoshop needs taken care of by Pixlr.com and everything else we do online anyway right ? So I don't need the apps of old, the apps of 2008, the old ways of working that held me back and restrained me from being able to work at speed.

Google. You don't need VMWare, period.

Google - you are an enormous company whose products get better and better, if you want Chromebooks to be a success in the enterprise get off your communal arses and think out the box.

We moved into a better way of working when ChromeOS was born. What you're doing here with VMWare is a death huddle. It's just Wyse terminals in shiny Chromebook form. It's 2004 all over again and it's actually saying we capitulate, we accept CIOs are that dumb to keep spending money with proprietary vendors for client software rather than develop and host software as a service in the Cloud. Frankly it's comical.

We're in the cloud for a reason, Google has the ability to actually do more in the Cloud than anyone, even Amazon - and Chromebooks are a key to that in corporate world. Only issue is I've no idea who with any muscle or vision in Google is driving enterprise ChromeOS because right now they have a bag on their head and they don't know how to talk to the press, analysts or the community at large using their kit.